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to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they
performed by national captioning institute] >> the u.s. house gavels in to begin their first bit of legislative work starting the lame duck session, four bills including on asthma inhalers and gavel back out when they finish to return for votes at 6:30 and we expect them to swear in a number of members filling out the remainder of terms for the 112th congress. we expect those to happen during the upcoming votes at 6:30 this evening. the senate also in session today and they have been dealing with a bill drk working on rules to federal land to federal hunting and fishing and the house and senate committees getting under way this week. the intelligence committees in particular off the floor, the intelligence committee of the senate and the house will be meeting in closed session to look at the attack in libya in benghazi this week. tomorrow on c-span 3, we will be covering a hearing looking at the meningitis outbreak. that is tomorrow morning at 10:00 eastern, c-span 3. the president will be hosting a news conference. we do not know the time of the news conference yet. this will be
the coaches and even leaks because many of the links i work with our code. they are not governed by u.s.a. football for pop warner. these guys can't come down. scott can't come until every coach in the united states of america this is the way you need to do it. so what we try to do at the league had to share this as an example that this is what you're fighting with the aggressors level is number one, coach kerri campbell and i went to a lake. we said this. you know i want to do? we played at the highest level, so there is a model standard. authority out there. the nfl authority set a standard for youth coaches in america. the problem is they don't embrace the changes because it's all about winning. win at all costs mentality. winning is good, but nobody remembers years from now. what matters is the effects of the game. so what we tried to do was, okay, if you guys want to improve safety and you want to improve coming you know, making sure coaches are responsiblefor me being accountable and credible, then implement the leagues are just like the nfl pa. they protect the west players. they
commander, jewish war veterans of the u.s.a. charles sasino jr., national commander, american ex-prisoners of war. leo haley, national commander, catholic war veterans of the u.s.a. william meeks, secretary, vietnam veterans of america. john hamilton, commander in chief, veterans of foreign wars of the united states. cleve gear, national commander aamvets. samuel hunt, national president, blinded veterans association. john cahill, national commander, army and navy union of the u.s.a. h. gene overstreet, national commander, noncommissioned officers. james kutz, national commander, the american legion. bruce mckenty, national commander, military order of the purple heart of the u.s.a. mark kilgore, national president, fleet reserve association. james tuey, national commandant, marine corps league. edward brogan, national president military chaplin association. bill lawson, national president, paralyzed veterans of america. benny atkins, national commander, legion of valor of the u.s.a. gary angen, commander in chief, military order of the world wars. jack clemp, president, national
it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on it again. >> mr. turner? >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for being here. i appreciate your leadership i want to particularly thank you for your work on sexual assault which and you were working on with the secretary of the va in your efforts to change the culture throughout the dod to prevent sexual assault and assist the victims. the members have been of service members and families transition and out of the military secretary panetta of the most important things transition with a family is obviously that raises the issue of
and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. >> we called it a calling. >> a calling, exactly. >> exactly. word of honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the affect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is done, but what worries me is whether
there versus the u.s.? caller: i was looking at a place in a number of places in the philippines a friend of mine i'm a veteran and talk to other vets and he has a very nice small apartment right across the street from the beach and it's $150 a month. host: do you get a military pension? caller: no, i don't. i just missed. host: host: we're looking at twitter page. back to our calls in memphis. how is the economy affecting your retirement plans? caller: the economy is affecting my retirement plans. when the -- before the market crashed i had mutual fund and a stock in a couple of different companies. as the economy tanked even more i was one of the people who was without employment. i was able to draw unemployment and so i was able to have that until i received another job which was at a greater pay cut. now at this point trying to go back to school, trying to get my mutual funds back together because i did cash one of them out. my ira is together. i never rolled my 401-k over either. at this point trying to go back to school, trying to live on less money, downgrading all the way, having
and caused the worst offshore oil spill in u.s. history. the payment includes $4 billion related to criminal charges, including $1.2 billion in criminal fines, as well as half a billion dollars in payments to securities regulators. attorney general eric holder said thursday the settlement broke two records. >> bp has agreed to plead guilty to all 14 criminal charges, including responsibility for the deaths of 11 people and the events that led to an unprecedented environmental catastrophe. the company has also agreed to pay $4 billion in fines and penalties. this marks both the largest single criminal fine, more than $1.25 billion, and the largest total criminal resolution, $4 billion, in the history of the united states. a >> critics say even their record numbers reflected in the settlement represent just a fraction of bp's profits and will not be enough to deter future disasters. public citizen called a settlement that the attic and a slap on the wrist, noting the deal did not prevent bp from continuing to receive lucrative government contracts and leases. under the settlement, bp agreed to
that brought down the head of the cia, general david petraeus. another u.s. general is caught in the same tangled web. john allen, top commander in afghanistan, is being investigated by the pentagon for allegedly sending inappropriate e-mails to a married woman, the same woman whose complaint of threatening e-mails from general petraeus' lover cracked the scandal wide open. barbara starr is trying to sort this out for us. it is rather complicated, what's the latest you're getting? >> it is still the same fundamental question for the last 24 hours, wolf. why is john allen being investigated and how on earth did he get caught up in this? marine corps general john allen denies an extramarital affair with jill kelly, the florida socialite whose concern over threatening e-mails led to an investigation that revealed an affair between cia director david petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell. a pentagon official told reporters allen who commands the war in afghanistan is adamant he did nothing wrong. a senior official close to allen tells cnn of kelly there is no affair, she's a bored soci
committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely been higher in a presidential election, and roosevelt shows his secretary of agriculture as his running mate. wallace had been at the nerve center in sawing off the perils of the great depression, easing the way of government subsidies with farmers to stay in business by cutting back on production. wallace provided food stamps. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conser
is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professor in government and asian studies and director of asian studies here in georgetown. carol lancaster, o
about the u.s. economy. i think consumers are where it's at. we just got to get over this fiscal cliff thing. >> jonathan capehart. >> i learned president morsi of egypt is fanatical about "planet of the apes." >> that is really all you need to know. jonathan, thank you so much. rana, steve, michael and everybody, thank you for watching today. if it's "way too early," it's "morning joe." chuck todd is next with "the daily rundown." >>> together again. mitt romney makes his way to the white house. it's not exactly the way he wanted to get there. but can something constructive come out of a private lunch between president obama and the man he defeated just three weeks ago? that's right. that was just three weeks ago. >>> also this morning, a deep dive into america's longest war. look into lessons learned and the sacrifices made by troops at one combat outpost. tell us about what's been accomplished and what's not in more than a decade of fighting. as the country wakes up obsessed with numbers and winners, for the lottery, that, we've got a very important update on the election night numb
, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the price in the form of lost economic growth and development, stifled innovation and social progress and diminished opportunity. so i will describe those threats and talk about what needs to happen for us to keep the global internet on the right path. to harness the opportunities new communications, technologies to benefit all. there's a lot that about the relationship between communications technologies and world events, but in some important ways the relationship between the mutations, technology and world history has always been a profound one. the printing press was a new communications technology that changed the world. it won't take us back that far, but for a few minutes i will take us back 50 years to a powerfully important speech given by an fcc chairman in 1961. that made president john f. kennedy's. , newton minnow, spoke to the national association of broadcasting. his speech generally remembered for the declaration that tv had become a vast wasteland. but the speech, and i recommend reading it was ac
work for the u.s. central command. petraeus headed the central command from late 2008 to mid 2010. and during that time presented kelley and her husband an award for raising money to pay for junior enlisted men and women to attend military balls. petraeus has told friends that he had no romantic involvement with kelley. and only saw her when she was with her husband. law enforcement officials say they found no evidence to refute that. and described kelley as a victim who received and messages.threatening some close to petraeus say he's told them the affair with broadwell began about two months after he took over the central intelligence agency in september 2011. and the affair ended about four months ago. friends of petraeus say he described the trust with broadwell as infrequent and he say he never pursued her after the affair ended. now law enforcement officials stress to us that kelley is in no trouble at all. in fact no one is roicly to face any criminal charges here. the fbi investigation in the end found only a personal affair and no concerns about national security. jses bo
at the u.s. capitol dome right there and another nice, warm day ahead. we'll see what is in store after that. good morning. i'm sarah simmons i'm wisdom martin. welcome to fox 5 morning news. >> here is tucker. >> happy monday. >> the weekend was beautiful. temperature-wise, we got to 70 yesterday. we'll enjoy the mild temperatures but the clouds will move in and rain tonight. it really won't rain until later tonight. >> are we talking real hard rain or just sprinkles. >> good steady rain overnight. maybe 1/4 inh of rain. the good news is it will be out of here early tomorrow and get some afternoon sunshine. >> sunshine but it will be colder, won't it. >> yes. clear skies out there at the moment but you can see clouds just out to the west. it will be a mostly cloudy monday us for as clouds out into west virginia will be moving in shortly. and then you can see the rain a little further out to the west out into western ohio at the moment and starting to push into michigan. those rain showers will hold off until later tonight. i think later this afternoon, it might feel like it will rain b
that there was a very large conspiracy, usually involving figures in the u.s. government, and a massive cover-up. >>> democratic national committee chairman wasserman-schultz celebrated gains for women in the election for the first time there are no all male state legislatures and 81 women in the u.s. house and 20 in the senate. representative wasserman-schultz spoke at an event hosted buy emily's list for about one hour and 20 minutes. >> since we have a devotee situated i realize we are a standing room only. it's great. thank you all for joining - stephanie schriock. [applause] and i am the president of emily's list. [applause] thank you on behalf of emily's list for joining us this morning. we are so, so excited to be here. can i just start by saying we won. [applause] and we won across the board. it was a historic night, just a little over a week ago, and we wanted to bring folks together today to share in a celebration but also to talk a little bit about what we learned through this election as we move forward. it's really about women, it's about moving voters and women candidates and th
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
talk about u.s. links to the drug war and the thing that is so impossible? you have to read it in some specific story and also find a back door, some different way into it. that is always an important piece of the puzzle. >> to look at another aspect of this, and citizens, witnessing with their cameras all over the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wal
difficult to deal with? why is the u.s. a decade into the war unable to go on patrol with afghans? >> one of the reasons is geographical. if you look at this relief map here, the border between afgh afghanistan and pakistan is very artificial. i've crossed the border many times. every time illegally. and the mountains that descend from the high table land of central asia to the steamy in this river valley, it's a very gradual descent. it's the same indough-islamic civilization on both sides of the border. so the sides that the u.s. military and diplomatic core is going to make two separate well functioning states out of it is somewhat adverse to geology. >> what's really going on, we tlinch are good guys and bad guys but there are guys the pakistans supports, the guys that india has sup pored, the russia has intended -- >> india is a big player here, fareed. because if you look through indian history from the guptas to the mull rans, the moguls, the dynasty, others, what you see is for many periods of indian history or sub continent history, the same empire that controlled the northern th
appointments, an inclination for restraint. i want to appoint judges who understand as a u.s. supreme court explained, that law is something more than the mere -- law is something more than mere will exerted as an act of power. if you think about being governor of a state like florida, your biggest legacy is probably your judges. we appointed about just over 80 judges now so far in 22 months, and so these are the individuals that are beginning to help -- decide whether we have three branches of government. i just remember civics, class, three branches of government, and i made sure everybody always remembers that in my state. the election is over. we may not be happy with the current occupant of the white house, but the question is what are we going to do about it? will you take action or stay on the sidelines? will you join the fight for conservative solutions with states like florida where we are fighting for families by creating jobs, quality education, and keeping the cost of living low? the time for arguing over who caused the problems has ended. now it is the time to break from the ca
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
in this age moving forward there are some elements of cooperation with labor migration. u.s. imports 2 million immigrants this is a trend that will increase. of course, some 10 trees it matters more. >> i would agree there is no appetite for a plush former integration our bilateral engagement. of the same could be said for china are other countries in asia. there are rumors floating around they try to have the unprecedented meeting of all heads the state's in his similar in the caribbean with a strong component that china can cooperate with every 10 but not economic engagement in particular. >> [laughter] that is the next summit of the america is. >> i am proud and honored to introduce two individuals. he is a former staff sergeant of the united states army. he is the first living person to receive the armed forces medal of honor for actions that occurred after the and vietnam war perry dead -- be it now war. the major general was awarded the united states highest military decoration for heroic actions in 1968 during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps over 33 years b
. >>> and all that matters. >> u.s. troops serving our country are being served thanksgiving dinner. >> thousands of miles away on "cbs this morning." >> from kabul, afghanistan -- happy thanksgiving! captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" on this thanksgiving day. happy thanksgiving. norah o'donnell is off. we are waking up to good news out of the middle east. for the first time in more than a week the cease fire between israel and hamas held overnight and continues to hold at this hour. >> people in gaza and southern israel are leaving shelters and returning home after that week of air attacks across the border. hamas and its supporters inside gaza are claiming victory. charlie d'agata is in gaza city this morning. >> reporter: it's like being on a different planet in gaza city whole world away from what this place was like 24 hours ago. people are smiling, congratulating one another. we had to fight through traffic for the first time. and for the first time people here got a good night's sleep and woke up without the worry of israeli
billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of the way first. i want to go straight to your blog. the sudden departure of general david petraeus from the cia tells us more about the state of our nation than a dozen petraeus. president barack obama should not have accepted his resignation. we seem to care more about the sex lives of our leaders down their real lives of our soldiers.
go i'd like to wish the united states marine corps a very happy >>> rain drain politics. why the u.s. is willing to tick out "-- kick out biosign tipses after years of education. i'm -- bioscientists after years of education. i'm steve usdin. welcome to "biocentury this week." >>> from alexander hamilton to alexander graham bell, american innovation has been fueled by immigrants. icons of modern american innovation, companies like google. intel and e-bay were founded by men and women who were born outside the u.s. some of the most successful life sciences companies, pfizer, merck were founded by immigrants. and america continues to lead the world in biotechnology driven by scientists and executives from around the world. now this pipeline of innovators is being choked by immigration policies that force many foreign born graduates of u.s. universities to leave after completing years of
on the u.s. military and diplomatic officials, to keep us safe and well. 9/11 brought terrorism to our homeland. two wars in iraq and afghanistan have placed around 60 million people in the taliban military. the current outbreak of new, dangerous infectious disease test our ability of strength. the commitment of america's health challenges on hiv/aids, malaria has elevated global health to a new and costly u.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year caree
decades and teaches at the u.s. naval academy. and sari horwitz is an investigative reporter at the "washington post." sari, we have watchedded shoes dropping on this all weekend. what new have we learned today? >> hi, gwen. we're now learning a little bit more about how this investigation started and more of what the f.b.i. found. i mean there have been a lot of questions of why does the f.b.i. do an investigation into harassing emails? i mean lots of people get harassing emails. i get harassing emails but what we found today was that this woman jo kelly who was a friend of the petraeus family, and she lived in tampa, she actually knew an f.b.i. agent and mentioned to him that in june she mentioned to him that she had been receiving these very sort of troubling, strange, bizarre accusatory emails. and gave them to him. he started the investigation. that's how it began in june. and... >> ifill: as we watch this time line unfold, sari, we can't help but ask who knew what when? for instance, we gather that the justice department, the f.b.i. knew about this some time ago. but th
and jim johnson. we have jim shelton, at the u.s. department of the education. the department, jim manages most of the competitive programs including i-3 and promise neighborhoods. previously he served as program direct or for education at the bill and melinda gates foundation and was the east coast lead for new schools venture fund and co-founder of learn now. finally with have with us eric westendorf, cofound other and ceo of learnzillion. eric incubated the learnzillion at haines public charter school in washington, d.c., one of of the highest performing charter schools where wes was chief academic officer and principal. let's get started. eric, and raquel i will ask you guys to go ahead and kick this off. real simple question. both of you are executives at for-profit education companies. we just heard parent revolution point out that the challenge with for-profits perhaps stakeholders will take precedence every the kids. why do education as a for-profit rather than a nonprofit? eric? >> great. so, let me, let me first start by just saying what learnzillion is and then answer the questi
of guard and reserve and u.s. army reserve. i mean guard, and active reductions as we go forward. how do i look at this? this characteristic that is important. people get confused with what is going on in the last five years and what we want to have in the future. in my mind, what happened in iraq and afghanistan is exact to how we have designed it to happen. the active component responded initially and was able to get things established and then as we needed more depth we were able to move into the national guard and u.s. army reserve to help us and it's gained that now significant amount of experience. that works very well. the ways we are organized now in the army, there are some reserve and national guard units that have to be ready to deploy very quickly. those tend to be combat service support outfits and combat support outlets that require much less training capability because the guard and reserve, the issue is time. it's not money, it's time. they only have so much time to sustain regiments to the characteristics of an active component is rapidly deployable, higher readiness able
. i will tell you here and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. quacks' of calling. >> exactly. -- >> of calling. >> exactly. honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the faaffect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is done,
, and commitment each of them so courageously demonstrated. i am pleased that the u.s. house of representatives is acting to pass this legislation to name the u.s. office in cocoa in honor of harry t. and harriette moore. passage of house resolution 2338 will further honor the achievements and sacrifices of the moores. leaders and first martyrs of our nation's modern civil rights era. designating the united states post office at 600 florida avenue in cocoa as the harry t. and harriette moore post office will demonstrate their legacy in a town where mr. moore began his service to others. this will serve as a constant reminder to our community of the important and lasting contributions the moores made to cocoa and the nation. i urge my colleagues to join me in passing this legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes mr. clay. mr. clay: mr. speaker, let me thank and congratulate my good friend from florida, there posey, for bringing-mr. posey, for bringing to this house, bringing to our attention these two great americans and legacy they left this country. and thank yo
. >>> tear gas in cairo near the u.s. embassy as the fight for democracy goes on. >> face to face. susan rice and john mccain, the man who wanted watergate style hearings, meet. and only cnn catches up with mccain before the big meeting. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> wouldn't you like to be a fly on the wall? >>> spyfall, real-life bond movie. yasser arafat's body was exhumed. was the palestinian leader po h poisoned by israeli spies? >>> plus this. >> you said walden is in trouble. >> i'm the trouble walden has been in, repeatedly. >> he calls it filth, the half in "two and a half men" begs you not to watch his show. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin with a high stakes meeting just minutes from now. this hour, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you
and the government will close on monday that most state and local offices will also be closed. and the u.s. postal service, the department of motor vehicles, banks, schools, libraries and also the public transportation schedules will be scheduled to mass transit holiday schedule. schools are not required to check with your child's school if they have the day off. and brian, what should we be planning for tomorrow? >> wishar cold start for the morning. >> it has been cold. with below freezing in some areas and it looks like it could be a good warmer. temperatures not as cold as this time last night with temperatures in the 50s. but, we are in the 30's in fairfield, novato. 37 degrees in fairfield. this live look showing clear skies over the bay area with high clouds for this even inf. temperatures above one, two degrees warmer than what we had last night. we have another cold start and some possible patchy dense fog along highway 1 0 1 as we go towards the afternoon sunshine and high clouds. to start off the morning, the purple heart in the readings in the 30's. and also, mid 40's san francisco, oa
with recognition. it is a setback for israel and the united states. margaret brennan joins us to tell us why the u.s. voted no. >> reporter: good morning to you, charlie, and to norah. israeli government says it gives palestinians a state without ending the conflict. u.n. recognition makes the west bank and gaza strip part of the palestinian state not defeated territory. without negotiating the borders of one with israel. here is the problem. negotiation negotiations are in a standstill. as we saw last week violent extremists like hamas are gaining influence. palestinian authority, which rejects violence, recognizes israel, is losing influence and patience. last week secretary clinton c s successfully negotiated the cease fire but wasn't able to persuade palestinian president mahmoud abbas to drop this bid. >> margaret, are there consequences for the united states and iz role for this vote? >> reporter: potentially. the concern is that congress could cut off funds to the palestinian authority. the u.s. gave about $495 million in aid last year, which helped keep that peaceful government in power. th
to the department of defense the matter involving general john allen. >> the pentagon is rocked as a top u.s. general is linked to the petraeus scandal. >> the u.s. commander in afghanistan is under investigation for alleged inappropriate communications with jill kelley. >> the sex scandal began when kelley received harassing e-mails from petraeus's biographer and mistress paula broadwell. >> federal agents were at paula broadwell's north carolina home last night for more than four hours. >> the fbi agent who launched the investigation that led to petraeus resigning is himself being investigated. he sent shirtless pictures of himself to ms. kelley. >> where do shirtless pictures come into the scene? >> you know, remember when we said you couldn't have made this case up. >> president obama will likely nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. >>> the founder of the mcafee software company is wanted for questioning in a murder. mcafee hasn't been seen since. >>> a scandal on "sesame street." the puppeteer who performs as elmo admitted to having a rel
, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector reform and egypt would weaken the security service more than it already is because there's been very little security sector reform as i don't see evidence of that. but also some of these the assumption that you are necessarily going after the leaders inside the security sector or security sector reform i think is a misconce
, it was a state was created out of new york and new hampshire. they fought over it. it has its reflection in the u.s. constitution. the article on the closet talks about how states will be made in the constitution, is merely a result of the conflict that we had with new hampshire and vermont. how is vermont going to be a separate state? so we had have that influence on the constitution making of that country. the cover image is a detail. if you look at the whole of it, it has everything about vermont that we need to know. it has an industry going there. it has a church and a meeting house. it has a microcosmic view of what the state is about. the mountains have not only been a geographic figure, but it is an agricultural state. everything that is going on in the state, it is somehow captured. it became the perfect image for we are trying to accomplish in the book by showing the variety. not this one thing, the connectedness to the east and the west end an important part of the development that goes on. it might surprise people about vermont in this one marvelous painting. >> in 1927, a flood caused
be honing in on. as well as you know, this year's conference is galvanized around a set of issues u.s. national security, six topic issues for the president in 2013. and let me just recap those for you because we want to drill down in these. the council selected u.s. economic competitiveness, u.s. education competing globally. the middle east, china, afghanistan, pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. starting with that. looking at its strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? if not, what would you change? what would you add? >> when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs council went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues and congratulations to you. i think you had them just right. i think there's an overarching issue on top of all of them in some sense enables all of them. and that is if you look at the national security challenges and foreign policy
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